Got Rusty Pipes?

Got Rusty Pipes?

If your home has an aging plumbing system, especially with galvanized pipes, rust can leech off of your pipes and flow into the water that comes out of your taps.

Rust is oxidized iron. It can originate anywhere from a water main to your own plumbing. Tap water can turn reddish brown due to iron particles that break free from sediment inside corroded iron or steel pipes

Discolored water. Rust can turn your water yellow, orange, red or brown. In addition, you might notice small pieces of rust floating in your water.

Stains on your plumbing fixtures. When your water becomes discolored due to rust, it can stain plumbing fixtures like toilet bowls, toilet tanks and sinks. In addition, running a washing machine with rusty water can stain your clothes.

Strange tasting water. People often report that water with rust in it has a metallic taste.

The proper method for removing rust from your drinking water depends on the source of the rust. If the problem comes from old pipes in your home, your best bet is to install new pipes.

if you have rusty pipes, plumbing repair should happen as soon as possible to prevent more rust from developing and weakening the metal pipe. Minerals in water that build up inside metal plumbing cause corroded water pipes. Pinhole corrosion is common and leads to small amounts of water leaking from the pipe.

Give us a call at 630-638-8651 or send a message below.  

Estimate Request

Where did you FIND US?

Check Home Status (req'd)

8 + 7 =

Signs Your Water Heater Is About to Fail

Signs Your Water Heater Is About to Fail

You can avoid the disruption and damage of a failing water heater. Here are four indicators that your water heater may be on its last legs:

1. How old is your water heater?

It’s crucial to know the age of your water heater. Find the age by looking for the serial number on the manufacturer’s sticker on the upper portion of the water heater
The serial number contains the date that the water heater was manufactured. But it won’t look the way a date is normally written. Instead, the serial number will have a date code such as “F051052638”.
F is for the month and F is the sixth letter in the alphabet, so it represents the sixth month, June. Next, the first two digits of the serial number are 05, which represents the year, 2005. So this water heater was made in June 2005. Each manufacturer has a similar date code, and they can vary; check the manufacturer’s website to learn more.
Generally, most water heaters that are more than 10 years old should be considered for replacement. If your water heater is in a location that will not cause damage if there is a leak, you can wait until it develops a leak before replacing it, but that really is not recommended.
If your water heater is in a location that will cause damage to your home, you should strongly consider replacing it after 10 years (or before, if any of the following symptoms occur).

2. Rusty water

If you discover rusty water coming from your water heater and it only comes from the hot side piping in your home, this can be a sign that your water heater is rusting away on the inside and it may begin to leak soon.

But if you have galvanized piping, you may have rusty pipes. A good test to avoid replacing a functioning water heater is to drain a few five-gallon buckets of hot water out of the water heater. By the third bucket, if the water from your heater is still coming out rusty, then most likely the water heater (not the piping) is at fault.

3. Rumbling and noise

As a water heater ages, sediment will build up on the bottom of the tank. As the sediment is heated and reheated, it eventually will harden.

When this happens, you can often hear rumbling or banging sounds coming from the water heater as it is heating up. This is a sign that the water heater is at the end of its useful life.
The layer of hardened sediment means:

  • Less efficiency — the heater will have to use more gas or electricity to heat the water.
  • More damage — the extra time spent heating the water will cause more wear on the metal tank and lead to more brittle metal that can crack and develop tiny holes. If you start to hear rumbling from your water heater, keep an eye out for any small leaks. If you find one, then it may be time to replace your water heater.

4. Water around the water heater

If you notice moisture around your water, you may have a small leak or a fracture in the tank. As the metal heats, it expands and if there are slight fractures, water may leak from the tank. Once the metal has cooled the inner tank will stop leaking.
However, before replacing your water heater, make sure there are no other leaks coming from either the fittings or connections to the tank. Also, make sure the temperature/pressure overflow pipe is not leaking. If all of the connections and fittings are dry, it may be time to replace the water heater.
If you are concerned about water heater failure or if you discover any of the signs above, contact a plumber or a company that services water heaters.

If you need help with your water heater, give us a call at 630-269-3995

 

source

Request Appointment 

12 + 6 =

Give Your Kitchen or Bath a New Look

Give Your Kitchen or Bath a New Look

The spring home selling market is NOW!! If you are considering selling (OR even if it’s just for YOU) – Now is the time to freshen up your home, by making it more inviting to potential buyers. There are ways to make that happen without breaking the bank which includes updating your kitchen or bath fixtures which will create a fresh new look. Overall, you can expect to get a good return on the money.

Just as old fixtures can instantly date a room, new fixtures can make an entire space look more modern and inviting. This is good news for homeowners, since swapping out things like bath or kitchen faucets and shower heads don’t have to be super expensive. There are a variety of style choices and a range of costs to make your bathrooms or kitchen shine.
If upgrading the plumbing fixtures is the only change that you’re intending to make to the space, be sure that you pick fixtures that complement (rather than clash with) the rest of the bathroom. Even if you go a more modern route, you’ll still want to match the rest of the colors in the room and the general style.

Give us a call at (630) 638-8651 to schedule appointment or complete below form for more information. 

Estimate Request

Where did you FIND US?

Check Home Status (req'd)

3 + 14 =

Bathroom Remodel on a Budget

Bathroom Remodel on a Budget

Homeowners who are looking to renovate their bathroom on a budget or who only want to tackle a couple of upgrades in the space should set their sights on the types of renovations that pull in the highest returns. This allows you to allocate your funds to the areas that will pack the biggest punch, and helps you prioritize your project tasks.

A mid-range bathroom remodel (think updated tile, fixtures, toilet, counters, and lighting) will get you a return of 70.1 percent nationally. And like the kitchen, doing more doesn’t equal getting more. An upscale bathroom remodel is only going to get you a 56.2 percent return, and a new bathroom addition just 54.6 percent.

New plumbing fixtures:

Just as old fixtures can instantly date a room, new fixtures can make an entire space look more modern and inviting. This is good news for home renovators, since swapping out things like faucets and shower heads don’t have to be super expensive at the outset.

If upgrading the plumbing fixtures is the only change that you’re intending to make to the space, be sure that you pick fixtures that complement (rather than clash with) the rest of the bathroom. Even if you go a more modern route you’ll still want to match the rest of the colors in the room and the general style.

Vanity upgrades:

If you’ve got a bit more to spend, consider upgrading the entire vanity, which includes not just faucets but also cabinetry and sinks. You can buy vanity kits that have all of the elements you need for one price, or you can put together the perfect vanity yourself. Make sure to choose materials that will have more appeal with buyers. For example, marble and granite are usually top picks for counter tops, while tile and laminate can look a bit too retro.

Flooring:

If you’re looking for a dramatic change, then upgrading the flooring in your bathroom is a good way to go. The average cost per square foot of bathroom flooring is about $2.50 on the low end and $4.00 on the high end plus labor costs (assuming you don’t install the flooring yourself). If you really want to take the floors to the next level, you could install radiant heat mats under the tile, which warm the floors for a cozy feel post shower or bath. On average, that costs an extra $5.00 to $8.00 per square foot. New bathroom floors—even when taken further with radiant heat—are one of the less expensive renovations you can do, but can also completely change the look, feel, and utility of the space.

Energy efficient updates:

Adding more energy efficiency into your home isn’t just good for the environment—it’s good for your home’s resale value, too. Your shower, sink, and toilet can all be optimized for low flow, which means less water usage and more savings on your water bill. It’s a strong pull for buyers too, so when you’re making changes to fixtures in your bathroom go for the picks that promise to use energy.

Is a Bathroom Renovation Worth It?

It’s up to each homeowner to decide if a bathroom renovation is worth the expense. Overall though, you can expect to get a good return on the money that you spend, plus a high joy score out of the project. If having a bathroom that you enjoy being in matters to you, then go for it. It’s just icing on the cake that you’ll get to recoup a lot of the associated costs as well.

We offer finance options 

Estimate Request

Where did you FIND US?

Check Home Status (req'd)

4 + 8 =

Clogged Drains

Clogged Drains

It’s important to take caution when discarding food scraps down sink drains. Although it’s best to be careful all year, food accumulates in pipes more easily during colder winter months.

If you do not have a garbage disposal system, it is best to throw as many food particles into the trash as possible. Grease, oil, and fats from certain foods should never be inside your plumbing system. Even with a garbage disposal, grease can cause significant damage to your pipes. Need HELP? Give us a call at 630-638-8651 or visit our website at: https://www.dupagehomeservice.com/

Estimate Request

Where did you FIND US?

Check Home Status (req'd)

8 + 12 =